Monday, April 3, 2017

'Scandal' in Colfax as film team wraps project


Concluding a grueling 48-hour race to finish, the Perpetual F film team turned in their 6-minute short film ‘Grand Forks’ Sunday night.
The project is one of more than a dozen shot and edited in between Friday and Sunday evenings as part of the Sacramento International Film Festival’s 48-hour film challenge.
The projects will screen at the festival on April 23.
‘Grand Forks’ is a creative adaptation of real event from the early 1970s. In the film, downtown Colfax stands in for the North Dakota town of Grand Forks.
“Pulling off a period-piece in a 48-hour challenge was super ambitious,” said Ed Fletcher, the writer and one of the producers on the project. ”The contest does allow teams to do some pre-production so we had a lot done before the clock started ticking.”
Directing the project was Damen Quincy Hayes, who is also teaming with Fletcher on a related documentary “Do the Dance.”
It all started with “Pink,” Fletcher’s true story script about the Sacramento 1969 battle of over nude dancing at Orangevale’s Pink Pussy Kat club. The recent death of key figures prompted the Perpetual F team to accelerate plans to tell the real story through the documentary.
“When the 48 came along we already had plenty on our plate,” said Hayes, who performed under the name DQ Hayes during his career as a musician. “But the idea was so good we decided to do it anyway.”
‘Grand Forks’ explores a chapter of Sacramento-born exotic dancer Susanne Haines life that isn’t covered by ‘Pink.’ When the club manager wants to cut her appearance fee, exotic dancer Susanne Haines cooks up a scandalous plan to scare up a full house.
“I kept telling people in the local film community we weren't doing a 48, but the theme for the slate of 48-hour films ‘scandal’ was almost too good to pass up,” Fletcher said.
Fletcher said his mind was also influenced by actress Bunny Stewart, who offered her services before seeing a script. Stewart plays Haines in the film.

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Documentary 'Do the Dance' hits fundraising goal

The crowdfunding campaign in support of Sacramento-based documentary ‘Do the Dance,” on Thursday reached its goal of raising $10,000 in 30 days -- just hours ahead of it’s deadline.


The project, led by veteran newspaper reporter Ed Fletcher, explores a racy Sacramento 1969 court case to take a broader look at the limits of free expression.


The indiegogo campaign received 92 contributions totaling $10,479 as of this publication. The campaign went into the final 16 hours needing an additional $716 to reach the goal.


“I’m excited to have met our goal. Now we can get back to focusing on making this film,” said Fletcher.


Director Damen Quincy Hayes said the campaign provided more drama than needed, but was glad to get there.


“I just want to get out there and make this film now,” Hayes said.


While the money generated through the crowdfunding campaign gets them a long way down the road, as Fletcher explains, they will need additional capital, likely from equity investors.  


The colorful trial over “bottomless” dancing at Orangevale’s Pink Pussy Kat will help to tell a broader story about the limits of free expression then and now, filmmakers say. The impactful Sacramento trial went national when Judge Earl Warren Jr. decided to take the jury to the club see the dancers “do the dance.” The case helped write the rules for exotic dance in California.


Fletcher, who grew up in Orangevale, learned about the Pink Pussy Kat trial from an older editor and soon found himself buried in old news clippings.


Do the Dance explores these issues:
  • Self-promotion vs Free expression
  • Female empowerment vs  Sexual exploitation


Historic photos, audio and background materials: dothedance.net
Connect with us on facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pinkfilm1969/   
Or on twitter at @pinkfilm1969

Drive to do 'Big Things' prompted crowdfund campaign



I've always believed I could do big things.
In high school, I built the "ram shack" student store.
In college, I took the school weekly newspaper daily during the Bayou Classic.
As a newspaper professional, it's been more of a challenge. Big ideas die because of cost, time involved or they don't fit the company plan.
Several years ago, I stumbled across the Pink Pussy Kat trial and believed I could make something interesting creatively with the story. Over the years, there were ample opportunities to decide the road was too hard and put it down. For years, I kept waiting for a big money backer to emerge or someone in Hollywood to call.
My last visit Burning Man (2016), I was in a funk. A year had passed and I was no closer to my goal. This year, I vowed to move it forward come hell or high-water. Rather than wait, I decided to make my own magic. This crowdfunding campaign forced us kick our project into high gear. We developed some amazing digital assets (poster, trailer). We also began the long process of telling people about this project with radio, television and print interviews.
Despite some obstacles, which I won't detail, we're within striking distance of our goal: raising $10,000 in 30 days.
At present, we have 16 hours to raise the final $714. Thank you for helping me do big things.
- Ed Fletcher, Ed is a Sacramento-based journalist and filmmaker.

Click here to visit campaign page

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Free expression documentary fund nears 70 percent


San Francisco topless legend Carol Doda performs during Sacramento indecency trial 

The online campaign funding a Sacramento documentary exploring the 1969 strip club indecency case that took the jury to the club is approaching 70 percent funded with 9 days remaining.

Using the crowdfunding site Indiegogo, Fletcher and his team are trying to raise $10,000 by March 22. Through March 15, the month-long campaign was at 68 percent of goal.

The feature-length documentary will use the colorful 1969 trial over “bottomless” dancing at Orangevale’s Pink Pussy Kat to help to tell a broader story about the limits of free expression then and now.

The impactful Sacramento trial went national when Judge Earl Warren Jr. decided to take the jury to the club see the dancers “do the dance.” The case helped write the rules for exotic dance in California.

Sacramento journalist and filmmaker Ed Fletcher said he was confident the team will hit the goal.

“There is so much Sacramento love for a deeply local story. We will get there,” said Fletcher.

The reaction to the campaign has been mostly positive, Fletcher said.

“Some people don’t want to talk about it or maybe they think it’s anti-women. To me, it’s just history,” Fletcher said. “This happened and we want to tell the story. I’m not pro-strip club or anti-strip club. I’m a journalist. But at the same time you can’t be afraid to show a little leg in marking if you’re making a project about free expression.”

Directing the project is DQ Hayes, an emerging filmmaker and former musician from the band Shakedown.

"There is love for this project from all over. We get people hitting up our page from UK, Spain, Sweden. Free expression and women's empowerment is universal," said Hayes.

More information at: Dothedance.net

Monday, March 13, 2017

Carol Doda, Big John Misterly clash in coming documentary film



Video clips furnished by the forthcoming documentary film "Do the Dance," which uses the Sacramento 1969 trial over "bottomless" dancing to tell a broader story about the limits to Free Expression. Do the dance is currently raising funds via indiegogo.
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Former Sacramento County sheriff lays out how women should be covered under a new ordinance being discussed in response to the full nude performances he deemed indecent.  As a result of the case, the county and state officials enacted new rules.

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San Francisco topless legend Carol Doda was called to testify during the Pink Pussy Kat trial. In this 1969 clip she talks about the difference between Sacramento and San Francisco.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Campaign to fund free expression documentary film hits 30 percent



An online campaign to help fund a documentary about the limits to free expression is under way lead by Sacramento journalist Ed Fletcher.

Using the crowdfunding site Indiegogo, Fletcher and his team are trying to raise $10,000 by March 22. Through March 4, the month-long campaign was at 30 percent of goal.

The feature-length documentary will use the colorful 1969 trial over “bottomless” dancing at Orangevale’s Pink Pussy Kat to help to tell a broader story about the limits of free expression then and now.

The impactful Sacramento trial went national when Judge Earl Warren Jr. decided to take the jury to the club see the dancers “do the dance.” The case helped write the rules for exotic dance in California.

"We are excited to be bringing this forward at a time women's rights and civil liberties are in the public conversation,” said Fletcher, a longtime reporter at The Sacramento Bee. 

Directing the project is DQ Hayes, an emerging filmmaker and former musician from the band Shakedown.  

The team kicked off the project with a fundraising party on Feb. 21 in Sacramento.

More information at: Dothedance.net

Monday, February 27, 2017

California beer bar challenged legal nudity limits of late 1960s



During the summer of 1969, a beer bar in the Northern California community of Orangevale dared to go full-nude setting off a series of legal challenges that ended with the dancers, including Carol Doda, performing for the jury.

"Do the Dance," a documentary telling the story of this wild and influential trial, is currently raising funds on the Indiegogo crowdfunding platform.

Thursday, February 23, 2017

Campaign underway to fund free expression documentary

The online crowdfunding campaign seeking $10,000 to launch Sacramento documentary "Do the Dance" is underway. 'Do the Dance' examines a 1969 Sacramento strip club indecency trial to tell a broader story about the limits of Free Expression.  The trial made national news after Judge Earl Warren Jr. decided the jury needed to see the dancer "do the dance." San Francisco topless legend Carol Doda also testified.  Learn more HERE.


Friday, February 17, 2017

Trailer reveals First Amendment fight over nude dance


Our team is excited to share the preview trailer for documentary film 'Do the Dance.' The film explores the 1969 Sacramento trial that helped write the rules to exotic dance.  Tell us what you think. Please join us for the film launch party at 7 p.m. Feb. 21. More details and tickets HERE.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Poster art for doc film "Do the Dance" revealed


Stare away

Check out these designs for "Do the Dance," our documentary. Tom Beauchamp and his team at Monster Design Co. put this amazing work together.
"Do the Dance" puts us in the Sacramento courtroom and "beer bar" where the son of a legendary jurist told a daring exotic performer to "Do the Dance" in a precedent-setting 1969 case. Get your tickets to our launch party fundraiser here.
The poster art (above) and the social media art tease with this tension, while the ink dot pattern and lettering help define the era. Do you agree? Tell us what you think.


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Burlesque Legend Angel Walker on the role of GoGo dancers


A lot has changed in taking it off.
Helping keep me on my toes is Burlesque Legend Angel Walker better known as Satans Angel.
Headliners like Walker and Carol Doda were the stars, but GoGo dancers were a key part of the entertainment. They kept the patrons there between acts by featured performers, Walker explains. Some clubs only featured GoGo dancers.
Just what kind of dancing was going on at Orangevale's Pink Pussy Kat a Go-Go? That's what a 1969 Sacramento trial set out to find out.
That trial is the launching point for documentary film "Do the Dance."
In this audio Walker talks Carol Doda, Go-Go dancers and the bar owners' push for more skin.





Here is my earlier interview for more on her amazing backstory.

Monday, January 23, 2017

Portland burlesque star featured at Sacramento documentary film fundraiser




The Sacramento-based team behind the forthcoming documentary film “Do the Dance” is proud to announce that a rising star in burlesque and strip will headline the film project’s Feb. 21 launch fundraiser.

Headlining this hot-ticket event is Ivizia, the reigning Miss Exotic Oregon. The event will also feature performances from Sacramento’s Midtown Moxies burlesque troupe.

The evening, at Midtown Sacramento’s Clara performing arts center, will premiere the film’s preview trailer, feature the presiding Judge Earl Warren Jr, an auction of “free expression” art and small bites from celebrity chef Adam Pachal.

Ivizia is a Portland-based entertainer who has been thrilling audiences around the world since 2001. With over 15 years of specializing in fire performance, she has also become a premiere variety entertainer and is guaranteed to ignite your fantasies. In addition to her hotter talent, Ivizia's repertoire includes roller-skating, cube spinning, comedy and a unique puppetry performance that may just give you a “religious experience”.
Ivizia holds the title for Miss Exotic Oregon 2016 and is crowned "Queen of Roses" for 2016 Oregon Burlesque Festival.


The Midtown Moxies Burlesque troupe were formed in late 2014 and have been packing the house ever since! You can see them every 1st Saturday at Midtown Barfly and every 3rd Friday at The Blue Lamp. The Moxies blend classic moves and elements with modern music,  sultry singing and hilarious comedy, creating diverse performances that please every guest.

“Do the Dance” is a feature documentary the uses Sacramento’s infamous “bottomless” stripper trial to tell a broader story about the limits of free expression.

Veteran Sacramento Bee reporter Ed Fletcher is the project’s creative lead. DQ Hayes, formerly of the band Shakedown, is directing and is a
producer.